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Teaching Literacy, Birth to Grade 6 Certificate Overview

Our Teaching Literacy, Birth to Grade 6 advanced certificate is for tomorrow’s great reading teachers, literacy coaches and remedial reading and writing specialists.

The program prepares students for initial or professional certification through five total courses and 50 hours of practical experience. An initial certification from New York State or an equivalent certification from another state is required

Teacher giving student personal attention.

Career Opportunities

  • Reading teacher
  • Literacy coach
  • Remedial reading and writing specialist
  • Classroom teacher with strong competence in classroom literacy instruction and assessment

The Mercy Advantage

We have strong relationships with elementary and secondary schools across New York City and Westchester, ensuring that when students graduate they are prepared with experience and professional contacts.

Mercy College’s national accreditation provides a seal of approval and enhances our graduates’ credentials when seeking employment.

  • National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
  • Council for the Accreditation of Educator Professionals (CAEP)
  • International Literacy Association (ILA)

Frequently Asked Questions

What will I learn?

More than just how to teach students to read. You’ll learn about the background and foundations of literacy, practices for emergent literacy, English language learners, and teaching students with disabilities, as well as child and adolescent literature, content area reading and writing, literacy assessment, and research techniques.

What careers does the Advanced Certificate in Teaching Literacy Birth-Grade 6 lead to?

Most schools have literacy positions at all levels including emergent literacy, early childhood, childhood education and literacy for adolescents. Also: reading teacher, literacy coach, and remedial reading/writing specialist. Our graduates also remain elementary or secondary classroom teachers who have strong competence in classroom literacy instruction and assessment.

Should I be certified prior to entering the Program?

Yes. An initial certification from New York State or an equivalent certification from another state is required.

Which state exams do I need to take to earn my initial or advanced certification as a teacher?

The following exams are required for initial candidates: EAS, CST(s) in your certification area(s), and the edTPA during student teaching, which is the last semester. Other state requirements include fingerprinting and workshops (DASA, Child Abuse, Violence Prevention, Health and Safety). The following exams are required for advanced candidates: CST(s) in your certification area(s).

Is there demand for these positions?

Yes. Schools need teachers who are highly trained in literacy. The recent emphasis on literacy in national and state education agendas requires that our elementary, middle and high schools employ highly qualified literacy teachers and specialists.

What education programs do you offer?

The School of Education offers a Master of Science in Education with a concentration in one of the following areas: Early Childhood Education, Birth-Grade 2; Childhood Education, Grades 1-6; Secondary Education, 7-12; Teaching Literacy, Birth-Grade 12; Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL); Educational Administration; Educational Supervision.

Program Details & Curriculum

Curriculum Overview

Advanced Certificate in Teaching Literacy, Birth–Grade 6

Total: 15 Credits

For a full curriculum listing visit our catalog. 

 

Teaching Literacy, Birth to Grade 6 Certificate Objectives

Teaching Literacy Program Goals

Students in the Teaching Literacy Program will acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to meet the literacy needs of children in urban and suburban settings, and will be able to do the following:

  1. Link theory and practice to create environments conducive to literacy learning.
  2. Provide appropriate instruction for students experiencing difficulty in acquiring literacy skills including students with disabilities and English language learners.
  3. Analyze assessment data for instructional decision-making.
  4. Communicate information about literacy to parents, caregivers, and school personnel.
  5. Set professional goals and responsibilities.
  6. Provide differentiated instruction that focuses on students diversities.

Goals of the School of Education

The unit goals establish the shared vision, mission, philosophy, and guiding principles agreed to by members of the faculty and other stakeholders in the learning community. The unit’s proficiencies, strategies, and assessments are designed to ensure that candidates acquire the academic, pedagogical, professional, and interpersonal skills required of teachers and other school professionals who prepare students to succeed in a rapidly changing global environment. The six goals reflect the integrated knowledge, skills, and dispositions that together ensure that candidates develop as effective educators and reflective practitioners. These goals are as follows:

Content Knowledge: Candidates demonstrate a solid content knowledge base that enables them to deliver effective educational and professional services based on current research, theory and practice.

Pedagogical and Professional Knowledge: Candidates employ multiple pedagogical and professional strategies and tools to enable them to be effective practitioners in educational settings and deliver services that promote students’ intellectual, social, and emotional development.

Diversity: Candidates understand the diverse cultural, linguistic, learning, and social strengths and needs of all populations, and incorporate and demonstrate sensitivity to the richness of diverse cultures when providing educational and other school-services.

Technology: Candidates employ technology to deliver information, instruction, and professional services to all members of the school community.

Reflection: Candidates reflect on professional practice to make educational decisions and enhance student learning.

Dispositions: Candidates demonstrate positive dispositions that enable them to work as effective educators, citizens, and practitioners within the school and broader community.

The six unit goals are supported by the professional literature including theories, research, wisdom of practice, and education policies.

Program Outcomes

By the end of this program, students should be able to: 

  • Demonstrate a solid content knowledge base that enables them to deliver effective educational and professional services based on current research, theory and practice
  • Employ multiple pedagogical and professional strategies and tools to enable them to be effective practitioners in educational settings and deliver services that promote students’ intellectual, social, and emotional development
  • Understand the diverse cultural, linguistic, learning, and social strengths and needs of all populations, and incorporate and demonstrate sensitivity to the richness of diverse cultures when providing educational and other school services
  • Employ technology to deliver information, instruction, and professional services to all members of the school community
  • Reflect on professional practice to make educational decisions and enhance student learning
  • Demonstrate positive dispositions that enable them to work as effective educators, citizens, and practitioners within the school and broader community