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Office Hours

Dobbs Ferry: Monday to Friday, 9 AM - 5 PM

Available at the Bronx, Manhattan and Yorktown campuses by appointment.


For questions, appointments, or sending in documentation:

Visit us in Main Hall, Room 109 (Dobbs Ferry Campus)

Call us: (914) 674-7523

Fax documents: (914) 674-7852

Email us: accessibility@mercy.edu

ACCESS Staff
Molly McCabe, ACCESS Associate Director
(914) 674-7523
 
Alyssa Seidel, Accessibility Specialist
(914) 674-7624/7764
Register with ACCESS

To receive accommodations or services, first you must register with ACCESS. To register, submit the following:

  1. Completed Application for Accommodations either online or  on paper
  2. Documentation of the Disability*
*For guidelines on appropriate documentation, please review the PDF iconACCESS Documentation Guidelines

After submitting the above documentation to ACCESS, a staff member will contact you in approximately 1 week to set-up a meeting to discuss your approved accommodations and how to receive them each term.  We also recommend that you review our PDF iconStudent Welcome Packet

Accommodation Memo

After registering with ACCESS, you will get a form called an Accommodation Memo.  The memo informs your professors that you are registered with ACCESS and lists your accommodations.  It does NOT mention the specific disability, and you are not obligated to disclose that information to your professor.

Accommodation Memos are semester specific and are only valid for the term that it was issued. To activate your accommodations each semester, you must request a new Accommodation Memo from ACCESS.

Don't forget to present an updated memo to your professors EACH academic term.  You should do this within the first 1-2 weeks of the academic term.

Have your professor review the memo and sign at the bottom. Once you have your signed memos, you can drop them off at the Office of ACCESSibility or scan and email them to accessibility@mercy.edu

As a faculty member, it is important to know your role in providing academic accommodations, policies, and procedures.

ACCESS Logo
Our Mission

Accommodations | Collaboration | Consultation | Educational Support Services

The mission of the Office of ACCESSibility is to collaborate with and empower students who have disabilities in order to coordinate support services, reasonable accommodations, and programs that enable equal access to an education and college life.  ACCESS serves as a resource to other departments and colleagues and works to provide regular training opportunities, advisement, and consultation on equal access, compliance, delivery of equitable services, and universal design.  Additionally, ACCESS provides opportunities and resources that will facilitate the development of self-advocacy, self-efficacy, and adaptive skills in students to overcome barriers a disability may present.

As a staff member, review some helpful information when working with students with disabilities.

Frequently Asked Questions
  1. What should I know when applying to Mercy College? Are there any special procedures? Students with disabilities must apply to Mercy College through the regular admissions procedure. There are no special admissions procedures. A student may, however, apply to the companies that administer the standardized admission exams (such as Educational Testing Services and The College Board) for provision of accommodations when taking standardized tests such as the SAT, ACT and GRE. Contact the exam administration companies for further information on how to apply for and make arrangements for standardized exam accommodations.

  2. What should I do if I suspect I have a disability and want to receive accommodations? If you suspect you have a disability that is impacting your academic performance, you will need to provide documentation of that disability to the Office of ACCESSibility (ACCESS). This documentation must be supplied by a qualified professional who is licensed or certified to diagnose the disability in question. An appointment ACCESS to discuss your potential need for services and to gather resource and referral information

     

  3. I received special education (IDEA) or 504 services in high school, how are these services different in college? Colleges are required to provide any reasonable accommodation that may be necessary for equal access to education. They are not required to design special programs for students with disabilities or have Individualized Educational Plans (IEP’s).

  4. If I am a student with a disability, will Disability Services seek me out to provide services like my counselors did in high school? In college, students with disabilities are covered under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). IDEA no longer applies. Since this is the case, the legal obligations change. There is no special education in college. Colleges do not have to seek out students with disabilities. It is the student's responsibility to seek out services through the Office of ACCESSibility.

  5. What role do my parents play in the process? Students who are 18 years old or older are legally recognized as adults. In this case, the student is responsible for his or her own accommodation requests and disability-related decisions. However, students are encouraged to have an open dialogued with their parents. Parents can be a wonderful source of support.

  6. I have a physical disability and have trouble getting around. What types of accommodations are geared just for me? Students with physical disabilities are encouraged to register with the Office of ACCESSibility every semester so that the office can help them with access to buildings and other university activities. ACCESS partners with Facilities Services to maintain an accessible campus.

  7. I suspect I have a learning disability; can ACCESSibility conduct the assessment to provide a diagnosis? Colleges are not required to conduct or provide testing. The student is responsible for providing current documentation, and any additional testing to support the requested accommodations, if necessary. However, ACCESS does provide referral information for local evaluators and counselors.